Lost something, Chris Hemsworth?

Archaeologists in Sweden say they’ve uncovered a “one of its kind” Thor’s hammer amulet.

The well-preserved Thor’s hammer — officially known as an torshammare — was discovered in Ysby in Sweden’s Halland province and likely dates back to the Viking era, archaeology experts said.

The intricate charm mimics a Mjölnir, which is the hammer used by thunder god Thor in Norse mythology and brandished on screen by Hemsworth’s superhero character.

This amulet appears to be made of lead but may have previously been covered in gold or silver, according to the Kulturmiljö Halland cultural history museum.

Experts said it was likely worn as an amulet or a piece of jewelry, adding: “You can see a hole in the shaft where it may have been attached to a string or strap.”

The Thor’s hammer amulet found by archaeologists
Archaeologists in Sweden said they recently discovered a Viking-era Thor’s hammer amulet in Ysby.
Kulturmiljö Halland
The Thor’s hammer amulet found by archaeologists
This amulet appears to be made of lead but may have previously been covered in gold or silver, experts said.
Kulturmiljö Halland

The hammer likely dates back to the 9th to 11th century when Christianity started to spread throughout Scandinavia.

Archeologists speculated that the amulet could have been worn as a marker by someone who still worshiped the gods and Norse mythology.

While similar amulets have been discovered across Scandinavia in the past, it’s the “only one of its kind” found in this region.

The site where the hammer was found
The hammer, which likely dates back to the 9th to 11th century, was discovered at the site of a future housing development.
Kulturmiljö Halland
Chris Hemsworth as Thor
The charm mimics a Mjölnir, which is the hammer used by thunder god Thor and brandished on screen by Chris Hemsworth’s superhero character.
Jay Maidment/Marvel

The discovery was made as archaeologists were inspecting the site of a future housing development.

Their search also uncovered flint chips, ceramics, metal fittings, pits and hearths that possibly date back to the Viking Age.



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