A Swedish investigation of leaks in two Russian natural gas pipelines that run under the Baltic Sea to Europe found evidence that “detonations” caused extensive damage, strengthening suspicions of “serious sabotage.”

Sweden’s Security Service said ​Thursday ​that it had seized evidence ​​​of what caused the ruptures in Nord Stream 1 and 2 ​last week but did not provide details. 

Authorities had noted when the leaks in the pipelines off of Sweden and Denmark were first disclosed that explosions were recorded in the area.

Denmark and Sweden have suspected that explosives were used to sabotage the pipelines that carry natural gas to Germany after high levels of methane were detected.

At the time of the ruptures, the pipelines were not carrying gas, but some residue remained in the lines. 

Swedish Foreign Minister Ann Linde (left), Swedish Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson and Swedish Defense Minister Peter Hultqvist hold a press conference on the occasion of the gas leak in the Baltic Sea from Nord Stream.
Swedish Foreign Minister Ann Linde (left), Swedish Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson and Swedish Defense Minister Peter Hultqvist hold a press conference about the gas leak in the Baltic Sea from Nord Stream.
Fredrik Persson/AP
A handout picture released by ImageSat International (ISI) on September 30, 2022, shows an image from an intelligence report depicting a release of gas emanating from a leak on the Nord Stream 1 gas pipeline, in the Swedish economic zone in the Baltic Sea.
An image from an intelligence report depicting a release of gas emanating from a leak on the Nord Stream 1 gas pipeline.
ImageSat International (ISI)/AFP via Getty Images

The ​incident​ ignited a new round of tension between Washington and Moscow over Vladimir Putin’s war in Ukraine.​

Russia accused the US of sabotaging the lines, saying Washington and its allies had the most to gain from restricting energy supplies to Europe, claims the West denies.

Europe, which had received up to 40% of its gas from Russia before the Ukraine invasion in February, is facing an energy crisis this winter after Moscow cut off its supply

Gas bubbles from the Nord Stream 2 leak reaching surface of the Baltic Sea.
Gas bubbles from the Nord Stream 2 leak reaching surface of the Baltic Sea.
Danish Defence Command/REUTERS

The investigation into the leaks by the Swedish Coast Guard and Navy would have involved unmanned vehicles, Swedish Navy spokesman Jimmie Adamsson said, because the pipes are in water about 230 feet deep.

With Post wires



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