A Texas congressman challenged President Biden to “come and get” his assault rifles — just hours after the state released an extensive report on the shooting in Uvalde that killed 19 children and two teachers.

“I have a message for the Biden Administration. If you’re thinking about taking our ARs, you can start here in Texas,” Republican Rep. Ronny Jackson, who was elected in District 13, said in a video posted to Twitter on Sunday.

“On behalf of all the law-abiding gun owners in Texas, come and get it,” continued the congressman, who represents a stretch of Texas from Lubbock to Wichita Falls.

The video was tweeted by Jackson less than three hours after the release of a highly anticipated report on the Uvalde school shooting, where the weapon used to murder those fourth-graders was an assault rifle. The report also revealed that nearly 400 law enforcement officers responded to the shooting and waited 77 minutes before they killed the shooter and stopped the massacre.

Rep. Ronny Jackson.
“Come and get it,” Rep. Ronny Jackson dared President Biden.
Twitter/@RonnyJacksonTX
Rep. Ronny Jackson.
Rep. Ronny Jackson posted the video just hours after the state released an extensive report on the shooting in Uvalde.
Facebook/Ronny Jackson

Jackson’s office did not respond to The Post’s request for comment on whether he knew the Uvalde report had just been released when he posted the video, in which he appears to rest a loaded AR-15 on his foot without the safety on.

This week, the House will vote on a law restricting assault rifles — making it illegal for anyone to “import, sell, manufacture, or transfer” semi-automatic rifles that have military features. The bill does not call for taking guns away from anyone who already owns them.

Jackson, who served as the top White House doctor for former Presidents Barack Obama and Donald Trump, has previously made headlines as the subject of a report last year that claimed he made “sexual and denigrating” comments about a woman who worked for him, CNN reported.

A police officer stands near the makeshift memorial for the shooting victims.
Nineteen children and two teachers were killed in the mass shooting.
Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images
Law enforcement officers  in the school hallway.
Nearly 400 law enforcement officers responded to the shooting and waited 77 minutes before they killed the shooter.
Texas House Investigative Committee/Handout via REUTERS
Police deploy in a hallway.
This week, the House will vote on a law restricting assault rifles.
City of Uvalde Police Department/Handout via REUTERS





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