Miami Beach’s iguanas may wanna run for the hills.

City officials are discussing putting a “dead or alive” bounty on the large lizards in an effort to spark some cold-blooded killing of the cold-blooded invasive species that’s wreaking havoc in the Sunshine State.

“People are going to go out and hunt them for money,” Commissioner Kristen Rosen Gonzalez said at a Wednesday commission meeting.

“I think that’s the better use of our money than hiring some guy with a raccoon cap, five guys with raccoon caps, that are gonna go around to the public properties — they’re not going to go on private properties.”

Rosen Gonzalez’s comments came during a discussion to begin a search for a vendor who would help keep the booming population under control.

“If we don’t do something and take action seriously, every single day these iguanas are multiplying,” she added.

The scaly creatures are an environmental concern and have been leaving mounds of poop wherever they go – and Gonzalez said the iguanas have also been digging up home structures and seawalls.

Miami Beach officials are mulling a bounty on iguanas invading people’s homes.
Miami Beach officials are mulling a bounty on iguanas invading people’s homes.
YouTube/WPLG Local 10
Commissioner Kristen Rosen Gonzalez claims iguanas are multiplying daily.
Commissioner Kristen Rosen Gonzalez claims iguanas are multiplying daily.
YouTube/WPLG Local 10

“I actually find a huge, dead iguana in my pool the other day. It was massive,” she said. “I’ve never seen anything like it. I had no idea what was floating there and sure enough there he was, or she.”

The city quadrupled its “iguana removal” budget from $50,000 to $200,000, Mayor Dan Gelber told Local 10.

Some residents liked the idea of going to war with the animals.

Local residents consider iguanas to be an invasive species.
Local residents consider iguanas an invasive species.
YouTube/WPLG Local 10
Miami Beach Mayor Dan Gelber plans on allocating $200,000 for iguana bounties.
Miami Beach Mayor Dan Gelber plans on allocating $200,000 for iguana bounties.
YouTube/WPLG Local 10

“Something more needs to be done,” resident Barbara Benis told the station. “There is only one way to get into them and it’s not trapping.”



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