A retired Russian general serving in the rogue nation’s parliament admitted on state TV to targeting Ukrainian civil infrastructure — with the goal of leaving Kyiv “swimming in s–t.”

Andrey Gurulev, a retired lieutenant general and sitting member of the lower house of Russia’s Duma detailed the shocking strategy on Russia’s state-run Channel 1.

“The absence of electricity means no water or refrigerators, the absence of sewers,” he said, commenting on Moscow’s recent targeting of power plants in its airstrikes against Ukraine.

“One week after all electricity is cut off, the city of Kyiv will be swimming in s–t, pardon my language,” he went on.

“There will be a clear threat of an epidemic,” he added.

The comments come as Russian strongman Vladimir Putin has stepped up his country’s bombardment of Ukrainian cities in recent weeks while continuing to deny the intentional targeting of civilians.

A picture of A retired Russian general, Andrey Gurulev.
A retired Russian general, Andrey Gurulev, admitted on TV to targeting Ukrainian civil infrastructure with the goal of leaving Kyiv “swimming in s–t.”
Russia-1

Meanwhile, Gurulev also advocated striking Ukraine’s “energy supply systems, banking systems, and the mint that prints the money,” calling the destruction of Ukrainian infrastructure “necessary in order to collapse the country.”

Yevgeny Popov — a Channel 1 anchor who also serves in the Russian Duma — asked Gurulev how strikes on civilian infrastructure could be justified.

A picture of Russian anchors, including retired Russian general, Andrey Gurulev, spoke about the war between Russia and Ukraine on TV.
Meanwhile, Gurulev also advocated striking Ukraine’s “energy supply systems, banking systems, and the mint that prints the money.”

A picture of Andrey Gurulev talking on TV.
“One week after all electricity is cut off, the city of Kyiv will be swimming in s–t, pardon my language,” Gurulev went on to say.

“How does it benefit us if the residential buildings are without electricity and water?” he asked. “We are fighting the military, not civilians.”

“If you have no water, no sewage — we’re projecting a flood of refugees towards the western borders, correct?” Gurulev responded, raising his voice.

The Kremlin loyalist went on to outline a scorched-earth campaign against the Ukrainian public.

A picture of police officers shooting at a drone during a Russian drone strike.
Police officers shot at drones during a Russian drone strike in Ukraine.

A picture of Kyiv residents sit in an underground metro station during a two hour air alarm.
Kyiv residents were seen sitting in an underground metro station during a two hour air alarm.

A picture of a residential building that was destroyed by a Russian drone attack.
A Ukraine residential building was destroyed by a Russian drone attack.

“Because it’s impossible to survive — there’s no heating, no water, no sewer, no lights. You cannot cook food. There’s no place to store food, no way to transport food. The monetary system doesn’t work, industry is at a standstill,” he said, in an apparent recitation of Moscow’s goals.

“We love everyone, but we have been driven to this,” Channel 1 host Olga Skabeyeva interjected.

A picture of people walking out of an underground passage at the Independence Square in central Kyiv.
Russian President Vladimir Putin has increased his country’s bombardment of Ukrainian cities in recent weeks.
AP
A picture of a elderly woman looking outside her window while holding a candle for light inside her home during a power outage.
“…it’s impossible to survive — there’s no heating, no water, no sewer, no lights,” Gurulev said.
AP

“We have no other options left,” she said of the unraveling of Russia’s war of aggression.

Russia has repeatedly denied claims that it intentionally fires upon civilian targets, despite overwhelming — and often explosive — evidence to the contrary.

Tatiana Alexeyevna mourns over the coffin of her son Colonel Oleksiy.
Russia has repeatedly denied claims of intentionally aiming at civilian targets, despite overwhelming evidence proving otherwise.

A picture of a man pushing a stroller while walking past a damaged building.
Ukrainian intelligence claimed Gurulev angrily ordered a Russian unit to burn down a house beginning of the war.

The degree to which Gurulev is involved in planning Russia’s war on Ukraine is unclear. Russian state media reports he retired from military service in 2019.

But Ukrainian intelligence claimed earlier this year to have recorded Gurulev angrily ordering a Russian unit to burn down a house in the opening days of the war.

Gurulev was among the Russian military leaders involved in the 2014 grab for land in the Donbas, leading several Russian occupation units.



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