Curtis Sliwa’s Guardian Angels plan to plaster the Queens district of defund-the-police City Councilwoman Tiffany Cabán on Tuesday with fliers urging local residents to call the cops when they need help. 

The move comes after the lefty pol and state Assembly member Zohran Kwame Mamdani released a guide for small-business owners encouraging them to try to mediate a situation themselves or call alternate city services instead of police when dealing with people with issues such as mental illness.

Two days later after the pair released the guide, an FDNY paramedic was randomly stabbed to death on the street, allegedly by a diagnosed schizophrenic.

The guide has drawn a heated response from critics who argue that Cabán is soft on crime.

The Guardian Angels’ poster, aping the prompts from Cabán’s guide, says, “If you see a conflict that appears to be escalating; If you see someone having a mental health crisis; If you see someone experiencing drug overdose: CALL 911.

“Always, always, always call the NYPD,” the poster continues in all-caps.

Cabán’s office did not reply to a request for comment Monday.

“If people actually followed her advice, they could get seriously injured,” Sliwa told The Post on Monday.

“What we’re saying is — as a group that is known for doing things on its own — call the police. Always call the police.”

Sliwa’s campaign also comes after Cabán last week tweeted that “Subway violence is a one-in-a-million event” — as footage surfaced of a horrific beating at a subway station in her own borough.

“Let’s not let fear-mongering politicians and corporate media outlets scare us into thinking we have a dangerous, scary public transit system,” her tweet said.

NYC mayoral candidate Curtis Sliwa, joined by his wife Nancy and his Guardian Angels, holds a press conference at 89 St. and Amsterdam Ave.
Curtis Sliwa’s Guardian Angels plan to paste the Queens district of Tiffany Cabán with fliers urging residents to call the cops if they need help.
Matthew McDermott

Cabán, who represents north Astoria and parts of East Elmhurst and Woodside, sparked controversy during her campaign last year when she put forward a public safety plan that called for “communities [to be] empowered to develop individualized strategies to help heal wounds of violence rather than being forced to rely on policing and prisons as the only recourse.

“Police do not solve most crimes and do nearly nothing to help survivors and victims,” her platform read in part. 

“If someone is in a situation where they need to call 911 because they are afraid for their life, police are unlikely to be able to help.”





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