A Taiwanese climber who reached the top of Manaslu — the eighth highest peak in the world — in “record-breaking” time and without using supplementary oxygen has had her incredible claim thrown into question.

Earlier this month on October 4, the ‘Goddess of Mountaineering’ Grace Tseng made the announcement that she’d reached the 8163-meter summit in Nepal in a reported 13 hours without extra oxygen tanks.

But since completing the climb, which has been well documented on Tseng’s social media pages, doubts have risen amongst fellow climbers not over the summit itself — but rather around whether she completed it in the 13 hours as suggested.

A picture of Grace Tseng on Manaslu.
A Taiwanese climber has been questioned after reaching the top of Manaslu in a “record-breaking” time.
Instagram/@gracetseng_taiwan

News.com.au does not suggest Tseng’s ascent to the top of Manaslu in record time isn’t accurate, however, the website ExplorersWeb suggests that the bad weather experienced by other climbers means a summit in just 13 hours would’ve been incredibly difficult to achieve given the circumstances.

With a surge of deep snow over the mountain, as well as a good part of the trail unmarked and ropes missing from the higher slopes, many climbers found the conditions so challenging, that group expeditions on the mountain allegedly retreated. As a result, it is understood Tseng and her small team of sherpas were left to climb alone.

“There was one meter of fresh snow — murderous conditions for even a slow trudge with oxygen, let alone a speed record without oxygen,” the website ExplorersWeb, a source for climbing and mountain news and updates, suggested.

A picture of Grace Tseng on Manaslu.
Earlier this month, Grace Tseng announced that she’d reached the summit in Nepal in a reported 13 hours without extra oxygen tanks.

A picture of Grace Tseng on Manaslu.
Other mountain climbers raised doubts about whether Grace Tseng completed the climb in 13 hours as she said.

“Ropes were also reported missing from Camp 3, and the trail was not packed down from Camp 4 to the summit.”

According to the website, the mountain experienced three days of high winds prior to the day Tseng’s record was broken.

“On October 1, at around 3 p.m., it started snowing and didn’t stop all night,” the site read of the weekend of the climb.

A picture of Grace Tseng on Manaslu.
Due to the surge of deep snow over the mountain, Tseng and her small team were left alone to climb the mountain.

A picture of Grace Tseng.
Website ExplorersWeb.com suggested that the bad weather meant completing the summit in just 13 hours summit would’ve been incredibly difficult to achieve.

“Climbers heading for Camp 4 stayed in Camp 3. Those coming down from Camp 4 after their summits got lost because of missing or buried ropes.

“Some were hit by small avalanches, luckily without major injuries. Some Sherpas moved from Camp 3 to Camp 4 in the morning to supply more oxygen for those waiting higher up, but in the wind, drifting snow had filled in their packed-down trails.”

Lorena Coroiu, who had retreated to Base Camp at the time of Tseng’s climb, said completing the summit in record time would’ve been incredibly difficult.

A picture of Grace Tseng's equipment.
According to Grace Tseng’s record, the distance between Camp 3 to the summit was covered in just 8 hours without additional oxygen.
Instagram/@gracetseng_taiwan

“In the conditions, I saw on the mountain, I think it is hardly possible to complete the route in 13 hours.”

Compared to Kristin Harila, Pasdawa Sherpa, and Dawa Ongchu — who all climbed in similar conditions on Manaslu in late September — the trio needed 19 hours just to get from Camp 3 to the summit with bottled oxygen. According to Tseng’s record, that distance was covered in just 8 hours and without additional oxygen.



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