​The liar stands alone.

Rep.-elect George Santos — under fire for spouting a resume’s worth of brash tall tales during his congressional campaign — largely avoided being seen in the House of Representatives chamber Wednesday.

Santos, who for a second day ducked questions about his lies and fitness to take office, ​popped into the chamber only when it was time to vote for Rep. Kevin McCarthy and then ducked back out to avoid the awkward images from a day earlier, when he could be seen sitting all alone, with no other congress members seemingly wanting anything to do with him. 

The Republican, who once he is sworn in will represent a district stretching between parts of Long Island and Queens, showed his face in the chamber three times, long enough to voice in affirmation of his vote before disappearing again into the cavernous hallways and the sanctuary of his office. 

Santos, 34, who admitted to The Post about spewing a laundry list of falsehoods about his background, education and family history during the campaign, was pictured leaving his office with what appeared to be members of House security and riding up to the chamber to vote for McCarthy. 

Rep.-elect George Santos on Wednesday casts a vote for Rep. Kevin McCarthy for House speaker.
Rep.-elect George Santos on Wednesday casts a vote for Rep. Kevin McCarthy as House speaker.
Getty Images
Rep. Kevin McCarthy votes for himself as House speaker on Wednesday.
Rep. Kevin McCarthy reacts after voting for himself as House speaker on Wednesday.
AP
Rep.-elect George Santos rides the elevator to the floor of the House on Wednesday to vote for Rep. Kevin McCarthy for speaker.
Rep.-elect George Santos rides the elevator to the floor of the House on Wednesday to vote for Rep. Kevin McCarthy.
Rod Lamkey – CNP

He kept himself scarce, the opposite of his behavior when he arrived at the Capitol expecting to be sworn in for his first day of work on Tuesday.

Santos spent much of his time then sitting alone on the Republican side of the chamber, looking glum, fiddling with his phone and fending off questions about his falsehoods from reporters. Only the little children of some House members shared the row with him.

Other lawmakers appeared to keep their distance from him even as they buzzed around him.

Because the House has yet to elect a speaker — McCarthy failed to win the needed votes in the fifth ballot on Wednesday — new members cannot be sworn in. 

Rep.-elect George Santos.
Rep.-elect George Santos.
Rod Lamkey – CNP

That didn’t stop the mendacious Santos, who was elected on Nov. 8, from claiming that he was. 

He issued a press release on his first day in the House that said he was “sworn in as a Member of the United States House of Representatives by the Speaker of the House on January 3rd, 2023.”

The release has since been removed.

Even though he has yet to be sworn in, Santos is already facing an ethics complaint in the House over his shady finances.

The liberal American Bridge 21st Century Super PAC, in the complaint filed with the Office of Congressional Ethics, alleges that Republican Santos falsified his financial disclosure reports.

He also faces local, state and federal probes, and Brazilian authorities have opened a more than decades-old fraud case against him.

Rep. Kevin McCarthy listens on Wednesday as the House votes on his bid to become speaker.
Rep. Kevin McCarthy listens on Wednesday as the House votes on his bid to become speaker.
Getty Images

Santos showed up Tuesday ​​wearing a blue sweater and a business suit with a black backpack but no wedding ring. 

The lack of the ring stood out because among his litany of falsehoods Santos claimed he was married, but has not been seen with the supposed husband since his fictionalized biography was revealed last month. 

The absence was even more conspicuous because ​married lawmakers typically bring their spouses and other family members with them on the first day of Congress to watch them get sworn in.

The openly gay Santos, who was once married to a woman, was seen wearing the ring on his left ring finger when he addressed the Republican Jewish Coalition on Nov. 19. 

On Wednesday, Santos wore a blue tie over a white shirt and a dark-colored suit. 

It was unclear if he wore the ring.

Santos came clean to The Post last month about the claims he made, including that he attended New York University and Baruch College, that he worked at Goldman Sachs and Citigroup, that his grandparents escaped the Holocaust, that he was Jewish, that his mother died in the 9/11 terror attacks at the World Trade Center. 

“My sins here are embellishing my resume. I’m sorry,” Santos said.

He argued that he never claimed to be Jewish.

“I am Catholic. Because I learned my maternal family had a Jewish background, I said I was ‘Jew-ish.’”



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