WASHINGTON — President Biden said Tuesday that Russia would be making a “serious mistake” by launching a “false flag” nuclear attack in Ukraine and that it’s unclear if such an operation was underway.

The Kremlin claimed Monday that Ukraine was planning to use a radioactive “dirty bomb” against Russian forces.

“On the dirty bomb allegations from Russia as it relates to Ukraine: Do you believe that this is the beginning of a false flag operation?” a reporter asked Biden as he got his fifth COVID-19 vaccine shot.

“Is Russia preparing to deploy a dirty bomb itself or a nuclear weapon?” the journalist asked.

Biden responded, “I spent a lot of time today talking about that.”

“Let me just say: Russia would be making an incredible, serious mistake if it were to use a tactical nuclear weapon,” Biden said. “I’m not guaranteeing that it’s a false flag operation yet. Don’t know, but it would be a serious mistake, a very serious mistake.”

The US, UK and French governments responded to the Russian claim with a joint statement saying that “the world would see through any attempt to use this allegation as a pretext for escalation.”

Biden said it's unclear if such an operation was underway.
Biden said that Russia would be making a “serious mistake” by launching “false flag” nuclear attacks in Ukraine.

Izium was hit had by Russian bombs in October.
The Kremlin claimed Monday that Ukraine was planning to use a radioactive “dirty bomb” against Russian forces.

Russian President Vladimir Putin signed legislation earlier this month to annex four partially occupied Ukrainian provinces.
Russia has been losing ground in its war with Ukraine.

At a Pentagon briefing Tuesday, Air Force Brig. Gen. Patrick Ryder said, “From a US standpoint, the allegations that Ukraine is building a dirty bomb are false.”

“We have not seen at this time, though, any indication that Russia has made a decision or intends to employ nuclear weapons or a dirty bomb [either],” Ryder added.

Russian President Vladimir Putin signed legislation earlier this month to annex four partially occupied Ukrainian provinces, despite battlefield setbacks amid a Ukrainian counteroffensive.

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting of the coordination council to ensure the needs of Russia's Armed Forces, via video link in Moscow, Russia October 25, 2022.
Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting of the coordination council in Moscow, Russia on Oct. 25, 2022.
Sputnik/Alexei Babushkin/Kremlin via REUTERS

Russian troops invaded Ukraine on Feb. 24 after Biden warned for weeks about a potential false-flag justification for conflict. Putin previously annexed Crimea in 2014 and backed pro-Russia rebels in eastern Ukraine.



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