Shocking photos show President Biden’s border crisis has hit a new peak in El Paso, Texas — where a flood of migrants is being dumped under a bridge because the city has no more housing for them.

Images posted Monday night on Instagram showed a long line of migrants — most of whom appeared to be men in their 20s and 30s — stretching along a fence beneath a highway overpass in El Paso.

Some stood with blankets wrapped around their shoulders and others had backpacks and containers of water on the ground nearby.

Other images showed men and women — most wearing blue face masks — sitting shoulder-to-shoulder on benches in a covered, open-air, makeshift processing facility in north El Paso.

The center was being overseen by Border Patrol agents in green uniforms.

“Over the weekend, an increase in migrant encounters continued in our #ElPaso region,’’ local Border Patrol chief Gloria Chavez wrote — while posting photos of hundreds of migrants under the bridge.

“Since September 1st, El Paso Sector has averaged 1300 encounters per day.”

Migrants.
Since September 1, El Paso has averaged 1,300 migrant encounters per day.

Migrants sit along fence.
A long line of migrants sat along a fence beneath the highway overpass in El Paso.

Migrants in processing center.
Migrants sit on benches in a covered, open-air, makeshift processing facility in north El Paso.

Migrants.
Normal migrant processing could be 72 hours, but with the surge, it’s unclear how long the wait could take.

Chavez praised her agents for their “phenomenal efforts” as they “continue to manage this migration flow.”

The Border Patrol’s El Paso sector saw a staggering 46.9% increase in encounters with migrants from October through July, compared to the same period last year, according to the latest figures from US Customs and Border Protection.

In July, authorities tallied 24,916 encounters, an average of about 804 a day, up 21.2% from July 2021, the statistics show.

The migrants processed this past weekend were released onto El Paso’s streets because the city’s shelters and hotels were filled to capacity — a dire situation that El Paso officials previously warned was a worst-case scenario.

The immigrants under the bridge have been waiting there to be processed while the Border Patrol provides water and keeps them cool with giant outdoor fans.

Normal processing could be 72 hours, but with the surge, it’s unclear how long the wait could take.

“The optics are very difficult; communities sort of panic,” El Paso County Judge Ricardo Samaniego has told The Post.

Unaccompanied migrant girls from Honduras cross the Rio Bravo river to turn themselves in to U.S. Border Patrol agents to request asylum.
Unaccompanied migrant girls from Honduras cross the Rio Bravo river to turn themselves in to Border Patrol agents to request asylum.
Jose Luis Gonzalez/REUTERS
A bus carrying Venezuelan migrants to New York prepares to depart from the Centro de los Trabajadores Agricolas Fronterizos in El Paso, Texas.
A bus carrying Venezuelan migrants to New York prepares to depart from the Centro de los Trabajadores Agricolas Fronterizos in El Paso, Texas.
Paul Ratje/REUTERS
Migrants.
The migrants processed this past weekend were released onto El Paso’s streets because the city’s shelters and hotels were filled to capacity.
KFOX-TV

“They feel it’s not safe anymore. El Paso is really developing as a place you want to come to. Tourism is starting to develop. People always comment how you don’t see homeless on the streets. So we’re going to go from that to seeing people sleeping on the streets.”

The local government has been busing immigrants out of town — including to New York City — since late August.

So far, 25 charter buses carrying a total 1,135 immigrants have left El Paso, the sixth-largest city in Texas, for other areas such as Dallas and Atlanta, the city told local FOX affiliate KFOX-TV.

At least one bus has made it to New York City.





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