Federal agents removed thousands of documents from former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate last month — only a fraction of which contained classified information, according to a detailed inventory unsealed by a federal judge Friday.

The property list revealed by US District Judge Aileen Cannon indicated that 11,179 government documents and photographs seized by federal agents on Aug. 8 bore no classification markings at all.

By contrast, 54 documents removed from the Palm Beach, Fla. resort were marked “SECRET,” 31 were labeled “CONFIDENTIAL” and another 18 were labeled “TOP SECRET,” according to an initial tally by The Post.

This undated image released by the US Department of Justice, shows a photo attached as evidence to a court filing by the US District Court Southern District of Florida, of documents allegedly seized at Mar-a-Lago spread over a carpet.
This undated image released by the US Department of Justice shows a photo attached as evidence to a court filing by the US District Court Southern District of Florida of documents allegedly seized at Mar-a-Lago spread over a carpet.
US DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE/AFP via

Agents also took 48 empty folders labeled with “CLASSIFIED” banners while another 41 empty folders were labeled “Return to Staff Secretary/Military Aide.” It is not clear from the inventory list why the folders were empty.

Of the top secret government records, 7 were found in a container in Trump’s office and 11 others were found inside a Mar-a-Lago storage room.

Meanwhile, 17 secret documents were found in Trump’s office and 37 inside the storage room.

In a redacted affidavit made public last week, the Justice Department revealed that 184 classified documents were mixed in with press clippings, personal correspondence and other mementoes from Trump’s four years in office.

The unsealing of the more detailed inventory list came a day after the judge agreed to make it public during a West Palm Beach hearing on whether to grant Trump’s request to appoint a special master to review the trove of documents taken by the FBI.

In addition to the inventory, a brief three-page filing by the DOJ was also unsealed Friday that updated the court about the status of its investigative team’s review of the documents seized.

The filing, dated Aug. 30, said investigators had “completed a preliminary review of the materials seized” and segregated all the records with classification markings.

“The seized materials will continue to be used to further the government’s investigation, and the investigative team will continue to use and evaluate the seized materials as it takes further investigative steps, such as through additional witness interviews and grand jury practice,” the filing says.



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