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WASHINGTON — “Girls Just Want to Have Fun” singer Cyndi Lauper spoke at the White House press briefing Tuesday before performing at President Biden’s afternoon event, where he will sign legislation confirming the legality of same-sex and interracial marriage across the US.

Lauper, 69, walked into the regular briefing without advance notice and said she was glad that gay and lesbian couples will remain eligible for marriage rights.

“I just want to tell you I came here because I wanted to say thank you to President Biden, Speaker [Nancy] Pelosi, Vice President [Kamala] Harris, and all of the advocates in his team,” Lauper said from the briefing room podium.

“For once our families — mine and a lot of my friends’ and people you know, sometimes your neighbors’ — we can rest easy tonight because our families are validated. And because now we’re allowed to love who we love, which sounds odd to say, but Americans can now love who we love.”

Lauper was not previously announced to attend the briefing.
Cyndi Lauper joined a White House press briefing ahead of the same-sex marriage bill.
AFP via Getty Images
Lauper has long been an LGBTQ advocate.
Lauper said she was happy that same-sex couples could get married.
Getty Images
The event was scheduled to take place on Tuesday afternoon.
Lauper spoke before performing at Biden’s event celebrating the signing of the bill.
REUTERS

Lauper added: “And bless Joe Biden and all the people that worked on this for allowing people not to worry and their children not to worry about their future. Thank you and thank you for being supportive. And hey, I will sing out to you. Thank you very much.”

Lauper will perform before up to 3,000 guests on the White House South Lawn as Biden signs the legislation.

The House of Representatives passed the bill 258-169 last week with 39 House Republicans voting in favor. The Senate passed the bill 61-36 in late November with 12 Republican supporters.

Same-sex and interracial marriage were legalized nationwide by the Supreme Court — in 2015 and 1967, respectively — and the bill was drafted due to concern that the court could reverse itself after it ended federal abortion rights in June.

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