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As you create learning experiences for students, what kinds of choices can they make? You might have a series of writing prompts for them to choose from. Or you might have a few different ways for them to respond and share their learning. In an inclusive classroom, you can give students choices on what learning activities they try while checking for understanding at the same time.

Earlier this winter, I shared a blog post titled “Help Students Discover the Joy of Writing Stories” using Clicker. In today’s blog post, we’ll look at ways to give students choice in an inclusive classroom as writers and creators. Students can choose how to share their learning while you assess with the same criteria. This can happen even if students have decided to create a different type of project than their classmates.

Choice in an Inclusive Classroom

The idea of providing choice to students and the connection to the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is something we’ve covered here on the blog and in a recent podcast episode with Kendra Grant. Giving students choices is important, but it can often feel like a challenge to tackle different types of student projects.

In a recent blog post on the Crick Software blog, accessibility and inclusion advocate Beth Poss asked the question, “How do I grade my students if they are not all doing the same thing without making multiple grading rubrics? I just cannot add one more thing to my plate!”

Inclusive-Classroom-Ideas

Beth provides suggestions for educators who value the idea of giving students choice to create an inclusive classroom. One thing Beth suggests is to design rubrics for an assignment that are standards-based instead of specific to a task. This way, the rubric or criteria for evaluating a piece of student work is open-ended in terms of the learning product. 

For example, students might participate in a writing project where they are asked to write a piece of informative, narrative, or persuasive writing. However, if your expectation is for students to present a point of view and support this with evidence, then how they accomplish this task – choosing different tools and outputs – isn’t a condition of success.

Saving Time in an Inclusive Classroom

Instead of creating a different set of expectations, or different rubrics for each project students work on, there are ways to save time in an inclusive classroom. You can create a standards-based rubric that addresses the learning experience instead of the specifics of the output.

To save time, you can create routines you regularly revisit. This way students understand they have a choice in how they share their learning. In this blog post, Beth suggests that educators “Consistently provide meaningful selections for action and expression from learners, allowing for familiar but not restrictive options that empower learners to choose what will be meaningful and engaging to them.” 

This regular practice of giving students choice can remove the time allocation and complications that arise when introducing a brand-new activity. In addition, combining the practice of providing familiar options with a standards-based rubric can help you save time.

Support for Student Writers

Using Clicker in an Inclusive Classroom

As you explore different ways for students to share their learning, you can use Clicker to provide choices for students in an inclusive classroom. Clicker gives your class access to a student-friendly word-processing experience. It includes realistic speech feedback, a talking spell checker, and a word predictor to support student writers. 

Clicker also gives students who need additional support access to additional tools. For example, the Word Banks feature sets students up for success as writers, too. It gives them quick access to words they can use to build sentences. This can help them share their learning with this extra level of support.

Ready to learn more? Read Beth’s blog post here to explore “Supporting choice in the inclusive classroom: Creating meaningful rubrics for learners and educators.” Or you can book a free consultation with a Clicker consultant to find out how Clicker will help you create an inclusive learning environment in your school. They are committed to helping you offer personalized support and learner choice without adding to the teacher workload!

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Comic strips are a fun and engaging way to introduce complex concepts to students. Not only can they provide a visual representation of an idea, but they also allow for a creative outlet for students to express their understanding of the material. Using comics in education settings provides students with a creative way to apply what they have learned about science topics.

Regular readers of the blog know that I’m a big fan of comic strips. You might remember this blog post, “5 Reasons to Try a Comic Strips Activity,” from last year. Or you may have listened to this episode of the Easy EdTech Podcast, titled “Liven Up Your Lesson with a Comic Strip Twist.”

In this blog post, we will discuss how teachers can use comic strips in their science classrooms to enhance student learning and engagement!

Note: Don’t forget to download these free templates I’ve made for your next comic strip-inspired project.

Benefits of Using Comics in Education

Using comics in education settings, specifically in the science classroom, can have several benefits. Comic strips can provide a fun and engaging way for students to summarize science concepts. This might connect to the types of materials students read themselves, like graphic novels.

In hopes of helping “make EdTech easier” I created 15 ready-to-use comic strip templates for your next lesson.

Comic strips can also serve as a valuable tool for visual learners. This medium can help them to visualize and retain scientific information. You can also use comic strips to promote creativity and critical thinking in the science classroom. Students need to make decisions and think about how best to represent scientific ideas and processes through visual storytelling. 

You might also use comic strips to facilitate group discussions and collaboration. For example, kids can examine comic strips together and talk about what they see, or they can work together to create their own and build upon each other’s ideas. 

7 Ideas for incorporating comic strips into your next science activity

Here are seven activity ideas where you can incorporate comic strips into your science classroom!

Using comics in education - Infographic

Introduce a science concept or topic

Use comic strips to introduce a science concept or topic. You might find or create a comic strip to share or have students explore comics created by a partner class. Alternatively, you could ask students to create a comic strip at the end of one unit of study and then save copies to share with next year’s group of students.

Summarize a science lesson or concept

Create a comic strip to summarize a science lesson or concept. After students have explored a new topic, ask them to create a comic strip to summarize what they have learned. This could include two characters, where one explains the concept to another.

Create graphic organizers

Use comic strips as a graphic organizer to help students brainstorm and organize their thoughts on a science topic. Instead of storytelling, students can use the comic strip format to organize ideas into cells. For example, this could be a way for students to combine an illustration or image with a short text description of the topic.

Illustrate a process

Illustrate the steps of a science experiment or procedure. To have students prepare for a science experiment or debrief after they finish, they can create a comic strip to show the steps. If using this beforehand, you might incorporate creations on lab safety. If using this afterward, you might ask students to reflect on what they would do differently. 

Spotlight applications

Showcase real-life applications of science concepts. Students can use a comic strip to tell a story that shows off an application of science concepts outside the classroom. Your students might also spotlight a science career or incorporate an interview with someone who conducts this type of work.

Don’t forget to download my comic strip templates, you can click here to grab them for free.

Leverage alternative assessments

Comic strips as an alternate assessment. To evaluate students’ understanding of a science concept, you might include a creative option. Instead of, or in addition to, a traditional assessment, using comics in education can also give you a window into student understanding.

Tell stories about data

Use comic strips to tell stories about data. To present scientific data or findings in a visually appealing and engaging way, you might have students use a comic strip. I’m a big fan of infographics, but a comic strip is another option for representing data. If students conduct an experiment or research where data is essential, this is another creative way to share that information.

Tools for creating comic strips 

There are a handful of great tools to help you create comics in your classroom. I’ve worked with the Book Creator team to create a few different learning resources, and I am a big fan of the comic option within this tool. Students can choose the comic option when they go to create a new book to access all of the comic book features.

Another tool for creating comics is StoryboardThat. This tool lets you combine characters and settings to tell a story. Students can use this tool to create their own comic using one of the project ideas on the list above.

Making Comics Using Book Creator

If you’re a member of my Easy EdTech Club, you might remember how I shared the steps for creating comics using Book Creator and Keynote. In addition to Keynote, your students can create comic strips by combining shapes in Google Slides. You might find that a tool already in your student’s tool belt is the right choice for this type of project.

Incorporating comic strips into the science classroom can be a fun and effective way to engage students and deepen their understanding of scientific concepts. By following the tips and ideas outlined in this blog post, teachers can easily integrate comic strips into their lesson plans and create a more dynamic and interactive learning environment for their students.

Note: This blog post was written with some help from ChatGPT for inspiration and assistance with the writing process. This tool has been in the news, and I’m trying it out to learn more about it and the role of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in education.

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In this episode, 2022 Hawaiʻi State Teacher of the Year Whitney Aragaki joins to unpack the term place-based instruction and delve into how to put this important pedagogy into action with students. You’ll hear about activity ideas and resources to get started with place-based instruction plus opportunities for integrating EdTech to make this happen!

Listen to the podcast episode on your favorite platform:

Tips for Place-Based Instruction

  • Interview an adult for generational knowledge.
  • Describe a treasured place and share digitally.
  • Utilize GIS and ESRI mapping to tell stories.
  • Try virtual field trips to make connections.

Sponsored by My Planner Pages

This episode is sponsored by my free weekly planner pages! I’ve created a downloadable set of planner pages for you that you can start using today. It’s a great way to stay organized in the new year or any time you like. Print them out to write in your daily schedule and tasks, or use the file on your tablet or computer to keep track of your to-do list and set your priorities each day. These planner pages are totally free, and you can find them at classtechtips.com/planner

Follow & Review on Apple Podcasts

Have you subscribed to the podcast yet? I don’t want you to miss an episode and hope you’ll keep following along with me on this podcast journey. When you follow along on Apple Podcasts the new episodes will appear in the app so you don’t have to remember to go looking for them… Click here to follow on Apple Podcasts! And if you have a minute for a BIG favor, add a rating and review to the podcast, too — I would certainly appreciate it!

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In this episode, Karol Górnowicz, CEO of Skriware, joins to discuss the importance of introducing STEAM education in K-12 learning environments. You’ll also hear how Skriware prepares kids to develop the 21st century skills needed for a future job market, including vocational education.

Listen to the podcast episode on your favorite platform:

Tips for Supporting Vocational Education

  • Start the STEAM journey early
  • Identify cross-curricular connections
  • Embrace vocational education opportunities

Sponsored by Skriware

This episode is sponsored by Skriware, a company introducing SkriLab – a full STEAM laboratory to schools, entering the US market as we speak. Skriware binds 3D printing, robotics and programming supporting teachers in introducing those technologies in 9 different K-12 school subjects. It’s possible thanks to the unique connection of hardware and software, with an online platform for teachers in the heart of the whole SkriLab solution. Skriware’s mission is to deliver to students an education that meets the requirements of 21.century and the future job market in a passionate and fun way, engaging both students and teachers. Learn more here.

Follow & Review on Apple Podcasts

Have you subscribed to the podcast yet? I don’t want you to miss an episode and hope you’ll keep following along with me on this podcast journey. When you follow along on Apple Podcasts the new episodes will appear in the app so you don’t have to remember to go looking for them… Click here to follow on Apple Podcasts! And if you have a minute for a BIG favor, add a rating and review to the podcast, too — I would certainly appreciate it!

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Do you teach STEAM concepts in your classroom? STEAM concepts fit into many different areas of a student’s school day. Teaching STEAM concepts across the curriculum is possible with intentional integration throughout content areas.

In today’s blog post, I have 5 examples of teaching STEAM across your curriculum, and I’ll share SkriLab from Skriware. They have lots of resources for educators who want to bring STEAM concepts into their classrooms!

4 Examples of Teaching STEAM Across Your Curriculum

Bringing STEAM into your classroom might feel like a challenge without the right resources and support. Here are four examples of how you can incorporate STEAM concepts in different content areas.

English Language Arts

Have students create multimedia presentations that explain a STEAM concept they’ve explored. This is a great way to incorporate speaking and listening skills and standards alongside a STEAM learning experience.

Math

In a math classroom, you can make a coding connection by asking students to make decisions as they build a robot. For example, they can change the speed and direction of the robot they built and think about how to scale the size and speed of their creations.

SkriLab Teaching STEAM Academy Resources

Science

Students can build models using the 3D software to envision different elements in their world. This could include building out models of parts of a cell or looking at how different molecules come together.

Social Studies

With their 3D printer, students can print out models they have designed that help them examine the shape and scale of different countries and continents. This is also a great way to help students explore various landmarks around the world. 

Note: The Skriware Academy contains lots of ideas for teaching STEAM across your curriculum. Use this link to learn more.

Teaching STEAM with SkriLab

Have you heard of Skriware or SkriLab? This month on my Easy EdTech Podcast, you’ll hear from Karol Górnowicz, CEO of Skriware. He joins for a special bonus episode. We discuss the importance of introducing STEAM concepts in K-12 learning environments.

Last year, I first met the team at Skriware at the ISTE Conference in New Orleans. So you can bet I was excited to hear that ​​they have earned the official Seal of Alignment with ISTE Standards for Students. This means that it aligns well with the ISTE Standards for Students and provides integration into design thinking, computational thinking, and group collaboration, too.

As I mentioned above, the Skriware Academy has lots of resources for educators. It’s an excellent platform for helping you quickly locate resources you can use as is or adapt for your group of students. You can find lessons for all sorts of topics, from geography (like in the screenshot below) to Chemistry and even early childhood education.

Teaching STEAM Academy Resources

Teaching STEAM Concepts

SkriLab is a new offering in the U.S. but has been out in the international market since the end of 2020. It is already used by educators and students in Poland, New Zealand, Ireland, Oman, and more countries!

SkriLab combines 3D printing, robotics, and programming into a single educational lab. In addition, the lab features several different resources you can use to bring STEAM learning experiences to all of your students. On this page you can find the details of everything you’ll get by bringing SkriLab to your school or classroom.

SkriLab for Teaching STEAM

With SkriLab, students and teachers will have access to a 3D Printer named 3D Skrinter, 12 SkriBot educational robots, 1 SkriKit L academic building blocks (almost 5000 construction elements included in the set), and more. Teachers will also get access to Skrimarket and Skriware Academy. Skriware Academy is an online platform designed to support teachers with STEAM integration in different subject areas. 

 As you can see in the video above, Skriware is committed to preparing students for the future. Their resources help students build critical thinking skills and creativity as they explore STEAM concepts in different subject areas.

Ready to get started teaching STEAM in all subject areas? This link will take you straight to Skriware’s website to learn more about SkriLab.

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How do your students chronicle and reflect on their learning? Video journals can be a powerful tool for learning and self-reflection. They can be especially useful in the classroom setting, where students can use interactive tools to capture their learning in different ways.

In this blog post, we will explore some of the ways that teachers can use video journals to engage and support their students. We’ll look at the benefits of video journals, some tips for getting started. And in Part 2 we’ll look at some websites and apps for making video journals. (This is Part 1 of a two-part series on using video journals in the classroom. Get Part 2 in your inbox as soon as it is live by signing up for my free weekly newsletter.)

Whether you’re a teacher new to using video journals or experienced with this medium and looking for new ideas, I hope you’ll find this post helpful.

What is a video journal?

A video journal is a video created by an individual (in our case, a student) for self-reflection and documentation. Video journals can take many different forms. However, they generally involve the creation of a video in which the individual shares their thoughts, feelings, experiences, or knowledge on a particular topic. Like a traditional journal, it includes regular updates demonstrating progression and growth.

Video journals can be used for a variety of purposes, such as:

  • Personal growth and self-reflection: Video journals can be a powerful tool for individuals to reflect on their own thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Students can use this medium to identify areas for personal growth and improvement.
  • Communication: Video journals can be a valuable way for individuals to share their thoughts and experiences with others. Their journals could be shared with teachers or classmates or kept to themselves.
  • Learning: Video journals can be a valuable tool for students to demonstrate their understanding of a particular concept or topic and reflect on their own learning journey.

Video journals can be created using a variety of tools and platforms, such as video editing software, apps, or websites. I’ll share a few favorites below. They can take many different forms, such as a narrated slide show, a talking-head video, or a more creative production with special effects and music. The format and content of a video journal will depend on the purpose and audience of the video, as well as the student’s preferences and skills. 

Video Journals in Math and Science -  Infographic - 1

Note: This episode of the Easy EdTech Podcast includes a conversation with Nichole Carter, who joins to discuss how to boost productivity with creative journaling. 

Ways to Use Video Journals in Math and Science

There are many ways that a teacher could have students use a video journal in a math or science class to deepen their understanding of the material and practice their communication skills. Here are a few potential options:

Demonstrate understanding of a concept

Students could create a video to explain and demonstrate a math or science concept they have learned. For example, they might use visual aids, such as drawings or models, to help illustrate the concept, like the split screen option in Flip (formerly Flipgrid).

Reflect on their learning process 

Students could create a video in which they reflect on their own learning journey, including any challenges or successes they have experienced. This might include a reflection on a science experiment, including what they would change if they were to do it again.

Explain a math or science problem and demonstrate how to solve it

Students could create a video where they walk through a problem step by step. Using a tool like Seesaw, they can film themselves drawing the steps on pencil and paper. Or they could use the whiteboard feature in this tool to explain their thought process and any strategies they used to solve it.

Include a tutorial

Students could create a video in which they teach a math or science concept to their peers or a younger audience. This can be an excellent way for students to practice communication and presentation skills. In their video, students might share information on what they learned or past struggles.

It’s important to provide clear guidelines and support for students as they create their video journals and to be flexible and adapt the assignment as needed to meet the needs and preferences of your students. A tool like Arduino’s Science Journal App is also a great place to start.

Note: In 2020, I released this short episode (15 minutes) of the Easy EdTech Podcast. It includes a few strategies for creating video journals.

Adobe Express Video Journal

Video Journals in ELA and Social Studies

There are many ways that a teacher could have students use a video journal in an English Language Arts or Social Studies class. A video journal can help students deepen their understanding of the material across content areas. Here are a few potential options:

Reflect on their reading or writing

Students could create a video in which they discuss their thoughts and reactions to a book or article they have read. This might include a summary or lingering questions. Students could also reflect on their own writing process when working on an essay or research project.

Present a research project

In addition to chronicling the research process, students could create a video in which they present the results of their research on a particular topic. This video creation might include a few clips from past video journal entries. Then they can add any key findings or conclusions they have drawn.

Demonstrate understanding of a historical event or concept

Students could create a video explaining and demonstrating their understanding of a particular historical event or concept. Their video journal might include visual aids such as maps or images to help illustrate their points.

It’s important to provide clear guidelines and support for students as they create their video journals. At the same time you can be flexible and adapt an assignment to meet the needs and preferences of your students. One of the great things about this type of project is that there isn’t just one way to do it. You may want to find or create examples to share with your students at the start of the project. This is especially useful if video journals are a new concept to them.

This is Part 1 of a two-part series on using video journals in the classroom. Get Part 2 in your inbox as soon as it is live by signing up for my free weekly newsletter.

Would you like to share your journey? Make sure to reach out and tag me on Instagram, Twitter, or your favorite social platform @ClassTechTips.

Note: This blog post was written with some help from ChatGPT for inspiration and assistance with the writing process. This tool has been in the news, and I’m trying it out to learn more about it and the role of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in education.



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In this episode, I share tips for tackling the often daunting task of student online searches with actionable teaching strategies you can start using right away! You’ll hear about smart searching strategies and skill-building activities to set up students for success when independently navigating online spaces in their own research.

Listen to the podcast episode on your favorite platform:

Searching Strategies - Infographic

Tips for Smart Searching

  • Share keyword search strategies.
  • Brainstorm search terms.
  • Post common search queries. 
  • Model troubleshooting.
  • Try voice-to-text options.

Sponsored by My Planner Pages

This episode is sponsored by my free weekly planner pages! I’ve created a downloadable set of planner pages for you that you can start using today. It’s a great way to stay organized in the new year or any time you like. Print them out to write in your daily schedule and tasks, or use the file on your tablet or computer to keep track of your to-do list and set your priorities each day. These planner pages are totally free, and you can find them at classtechtips.com/planner

Follow & Review on Apple Podcasts

Have you subscribed to the podcast yet? I don’t want you to miss an episode and hope you’ll keep following along with me on this podcast journey. When you follow along on Apple Podcasts the new episodes will appear in the app so you don’t have to remember to go looking for them… Click here to follow on Apple Podcasts! And if you have a minute for a BIG favor, add a rating and review to the podcast, too — I would certainly appreciate it!

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Graphic novels and comics are a fun and engaging way to incorporate reading and visual literacy into your next classroom activity. But what exactly are graphic novels? How can you actually use comics in your classroom? There are lots of ways to use comics with students.

Graphic novels are longer works of fiction or nonfiction that are presented in a comic book format. They include illustrations and text working together to tell a story. You might have explored the popular “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” series by Jeff Kinney or one of the graphic novel examples I listed below.

Comics, on the other hand, are shorter works typically found in newspapers or magazines. Both graphic novels and comics can cover a wide range of genres and themes. This could include superhero stories or historical fiction, and even nonfiction explorations of science and social issues.

comic-book-google-slides-theme

5 Quick Classroom Activities With Comics

In this blog post, I’ll share some activities and lesson ideas for using graphic novels and comics in the classroom. And I’ll introduce you to a few popular examples of graphic novels suitable for K-12 students of all ages. So whether you’re a seasoned comics reader or new to the genre, I hope you’ll find something useful and inspiring in this post!

Don’t forget to grab my free comic templates here.

Here are five quick and easy ways to use comics in your classroom:

Pre-Reading Activity

Use comics as a pre-reading activity to introduce a new topic or theme. For example, have students read a comic you’ve found that sets the stage for reading. Alternatively, ask students to create their own comics that explore the key concepts or ideas that will be covered in the upcoming lesson, such as a comic on ocean animals, before reading about different factors in an ecosystem.

Ways to use comics - Infographic

Creative Writing Prompt

Use comics as a creative writing prompt. Have students write a short story or narrative using the panels of a comic strip as a structure. One of my favorite tools for creating comics is Book Creator, and you might have caught one of the webinars I’ve hosted for them on how to use this engaging tool.

Summarize Key Ideas

Use comics as a way to summarize or review key information from a lesson. Have students create a comic that illustrates the key points or ideas from the lesson in a fun and engaging way. This is something they can do on their own or as a collaborative activity.

Check for Understanding

Use comics as a form of formative assessment. Have students create a comic that demonstrates their understanding of a concept or idea and use it as a basis for evaluating their knowledge. You might provide a checklist for them of information to include for you to figure out how well they understand something.

Boost Collaboration

Use comics as a way to encourage collaboration and teamwork. For example, have students work in groups to create a comic that tells a story or illustrates a concept, and have them share their comics with the class. This is an excellent way for students to give feedback to one another, too.

Creating Comics and Reading Graphic Novels 

If your students love making comics, you may want to introduce graphic novels as an option for independent reading. As I mentioned earlier in the post, graphic novels are a popular form of reading material for students. It’s an excellent genre for student readers for several reasons.

First, graphic novels often have engaging storylines and visually appealing illustrations. These features can help to hold the reader’s attention and make the reading experience more enjoyable. This can be particularly useful for students who may not be as interested in traditional texts or who have difficulty with reading stamina.

Second, graphic novels can be a helpful tool for building specific reading skills. The combination of text and illustrations in graphic novels can provide contextual clues and help students better understand and retain the content they are reading. So if you are teaching context clues, graphic novels might be a format to introduce to students.

Third, graphic novels are a great way to introduce students to a variety of genres and themes. There are graphic novels available in a wide range of styles and subjects, including fiction, nonfiction, fantasy, science fiction, and more. These can help broaden students’ literary horizons and expose them to new ideas and perspectives. 

Finally, graphic novels can be a valuable resource for teachers, as they can be used to supplement traditional texts. They also provide an alternative way of presenting information to students. Teachers can use graphic novels to engage students in discussions about themes and characters and to encourage critical thinking and analysis.

Note: Grab my free comic templates here.

In hopes of helping “make EdTech easier” I created 15 ready-to-use comic strip templates for your next lesson.

Graphic Novels for Students

There are many popular graphic novels that are suitable for elementary and middle school-aged students. Here are a few examples:

  1. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” by Jeff Kinney: This popular series follows the adventures of middle schooler Greg as he navigates the challenges of adolescence.
  2. “Percy Jackson and the Olympians” by Rick Riordan: This series follows the adventures of Percy Jackson, a young demigod who discovers he is the son of Poseidon, and there are graphic novel versions of the popular chapter books.
  3. “The Baby-Sitters Club” by Ann M. Martin & Raina Telgemeier: This graphic novel series is based on the popular book series of the same name and follows the adventures of a group of middle school friends who start a babysitting business.
  4. “Amulet” by Kazu Kibuishi: This graphic novel series follows the adventures of Emily and her brother Navin as they journey through a magical world to save their mother.
  5. “Big Nate” by Lincoln Peirce: This graphic novel series follows the adventures of Nate, a mischievous and energetic sixth grader.

By incorporating comics into your lesson plans, you can create a more dynamic and interactive learning environment for your students. Whether you use them as a starting point for discussions, a way to introduce new concepts, or as a tool for assessment, comics can be a valuable addition to any classroom. Give these five quick and easy ways to use comics in your classroom a try, and see how they can enhance your students’ learning and engagement.

Note: This blog post was written with some help from ChatGPT for inspiration and assistance with the writing process. This tool has been in the news, and I’m trying it out to learn more about it and the role of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in education.

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What have you listened to this year? Thanks to Spotify Wrapped, I know that have listened to thousands minutes of podcasts this year. And my most listened-to podcast was Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway. Now I tend to listen to podcasts like the radio, or at least that’s the story I’m going with to explain why my number of minutes is so ridiculously high. In this blog post, I’ll highlight some of the most popular Easy EdTech Podcast episodes from this year, in case you’re looking to increase your own listening minutes with a some EdTech tips.

What will are 5 of the most listened-to episodes? You’ll see the list and a brief summary of what each Easy EdTech Podcast episode covers below. A quick note, I didn’t include the bonus episodes on the list. But if you want to see a full list of these ones, this link will take you straight to all of the bonus episodes.

How to Listen to Your First Podcast

Now I know that not everyone is as avid of a podcast fan as I am. So before we dive into the list, I want to share with you how to listen to a podcast. If you’re a seasoned podcast listener, this list might be one you share. Maybe with a colleague, friend, or family member who hasn’t explored this medium.

To find and listen to a podcast, follow these steps:

  1. On your phone or computer, open your preferred web browser and go to a podcast directory or search engine. This could include, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Google Podcasts.
  2. In the search bar, type in the name of the podcast you want to listen to. O type in a keyword related to the topic you are interested in.
  3. A list of podcasts related to your search will appear. Browse through the list and select the podcast you want to listen to.
  4. On the podcast’s page, you will see a list of episodes. Select the episode you want to listen to and click on the play button to start listening.
  5. Most podcast players also allow you to adjust the playback speed, skip ahead or back, and save episodes to listen to later. You can also subscribe to or follow the podcast to automatically receive new episodes as they are released.

Note: If you don’t want to download a new app on your phone, Google Podcasts is a great choice. Here is a list of tips for using the free podcast player from Google.

This powerful drag-and-drop app builder for educators (or anyone) is lets you create custom apps for their classroom, school, and district.

The Most Listened-to Easy EdTech Podcast Episodes 

The Easy EdTech Podcast is a weekly show that features interviews with educators and experts on the latest in educational technology. You’ll find a combination of interviews and solo episodes where I share strategies and tips related to thoughtful technology integration. This year, I’ve even shared a few excerpts from my book EdTech Essentials: The Top 10 Technology Strategies for All Learning Environments.

To find and listen to a podcast - Infographic

With almost 200 episodes to choose from, it can be hard to know which ones to listen to first. So, in no particular order, this list includes the most listened-to episodes of the Easy EdTech Podcast in 2022.

Just 3 Tech Tips to Try This Year – 147

In this episode, I share three tech tips to try this year to make EdTech easier and help you focus on the essentials.  You’ll hear how to tailor these three tips to different grade levels, subject areas, and even different roles to keep things simple this school year! Click here to listen.

What Does an Instructional Technology Specialist Do? with Rosie Fleming – 156

In this episode, Rosie Fleming joins to share what her day-to-day looks like as an Instructional Technology Specialist.  You’ll also hear ways to get involved with tech leadership in your school and steps you can take to pursue the role of Instructional Technology Specialist. Click here to listen.

A Quick Activity to Introduce Memes to Students – 151

In this episode, I share a favorite, quick meme activity to promote critical thinking and creativity around any topic.  You’ll also hear about three spotlight tools to get you started plus how you can use EdTech tools that you already have in your tool belt for this meme creation activity. Click here to listen.

How To Build Your Makerspace from the Ground Up with Caroline Haebig – 146

In this episode, educator Caroline Haebig joins to unpack Maker Learning culture and share resources for building a makerspace from the ground up. You’ll hear tips for using the Design Thinking process and how to connect students to an authentic audience! Click here to listen.

How EdTech Connects to Climate Change Education with Dr. Jennifer Williams – 145

In this episode, author and educational leader Dr. Jennifer Williams joins to discuss the role education technology plays in climate change education. You’ll also hear connections to cross-curricular activities, social-emotional learning, media literacy, and more. Click here to listen.

Making a case for including a STEM program in your back-to-school plan with this list of five reasons to try a STEM program this year.

Fitting Podcasts into a Busy Schedule

If you are busy, you can make time to listen to podcasts by setting aside dedicated time for listening. For example, you can listen to podcasts during your commute, while exercising, or doing household chores. I often listen to new episodes when I get ready for work in the morning, playing them on my speaker or with my Airpods in. You can also use podcast-listening apps that allow you to speed up or slow down the playback speed so that you can fit more content in a shorter amount of time. In a blog post from earlier this year, I shared a few tips for making the most of podcasts with eight quick tips.

Another option is to subscribe to podcasts and have new episodes automatically downloaded to your device, so you can listen to them whenever you have the time. Although this can take up storage space, it’s a good option if you like to “binge” a few episodes at a time or skip around. Additionally, many podcasts (including the Easy EdTech Podcast) give listeners access to written transcripts of the podcast episodes, which you can read or skim at your convenience.

Whether you are new to the Easy EdTech Podcast or have been listening for a while, these popular episodes are designed to provide insights and practical tips for using technology in the classroom. Tune in to hear from expert educators and learn how to integrate technology into your teaching in meaningful and effective ways. 

Use one of these links to follow along and get instant access to everything new in 2023!

Note: This blog post was written with some help from ChatGPT for inspiration and assistance with the writing process. This tool has been in the news and I’m trying it out to learn more about it and the role of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in education.

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In this episode, I spotlight a section of my book, EdTech Essentials, all about different strategies for tech-friendly discussions that promote collaboration in your classroom. You’ll also hear about plenty of digital tools you and your students can use for discussions in real-time or with a delay, using text, video, and more!

Listen to the podcast episode on your favorite platform:

Discussions That Promote Collaboration - Infographics

Tips for Discussions That Promote Collaboration

  • Synchronous discussions
  • Asynchronous discussions
  • Text-based discussions
  • Video-based discussions
  • Audio-based discussions

Sponsored by My Planner Pages

This episode is sponsored by my free weekly planner pages! I’ve created a downloadable set of planner pages for you that you can start using today. It’s a great way to stay organized in the new year or any time you like. Print them out to write in your daily schedule and tasks, or use the file on your tablet or computer to keep track of your to-do list and set your priorities each day. These planner pages are totally free, and you can find them at classtechtips.com/planner

Follow & Review on Apple Podcasts

Have you subscribed to the podcast yet? I don’t want you to miss an episode and hope you’ll keep following along with me on this podcast journey. When you follow along on Apple Podcasts the new episodes will appear in the app so you don’t have to remember to go looking for them… Click here to follow on Apple Podcasts! And if you have a minute for a BIG favor, add a rating and review to the podcast, too — I would certainly appreciate it!

Episode Resources

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