Arizona firefighters executed a daring rescue during raging floods last week — using their truck’s ladder to help 25 people, including an infant, to safety.

Two Tucson Fire Department trucks responded to the Friday night flooding as the large group was trapped at the low water crossing in Bear Canyon, part of the Sabino Canyon Recreation Area, as water levels rapidly rose, making the trek treacherous.

The water was traveling at a rate of over 3,000 cubic feet per second, more than 900% the rate to safely cross the area on foot, the Coronado National Forest said.

A Firefighter hands off a child as flood waters rage beneath them.
A firefighter hands off a child as flood waters rage beneath them.
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“This maneuver was imperative as the rescuers anticipated continued storms in the area and the water to rise,” the agency wrote on Facebook.

The smoke eaters came to the aid of the Coronado National Forest and Pima County Search & Rescue to perform a ladder rescue.

Firefighters positioned their engine in shallow flooded waters so the ladder could reach the other side of the crossing. Videos of the recovery show rescuers leading hikers across the ladder. One firefighter could be seen handing the infant off after carrying the baby across himself.

Below, the water gushes over the crossing, completely submerging the path.

“During monsoon season it is best to avoid water crossings. Water can rise quickly from rain on Mt Lemmon. You could be stranded for several hours if you choose to cross water,” Pima County Sherrif’s Department warned following the rescue.

Monsoon season in Arizona, which lasts from June through September, is expected to peak this weekend, according to AZ Central.

A person climbs across a fire ladder over the raging flood waters in Arizona.
A person climbs across a fire ladder over the raging flood waters in Arizona.
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The 21 adults, three children and infant safely made their way across. The Fire Department said one person sustained a sprained ankle.

“Just another day in the life for #TucsonFire!” the agency wrote on Facebook.





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